If you fail to honor your people, they will fail to honor you. It is said of a good leader that when the work is done, the aim fulfilled, the people will say, ‘We did this ourselves’.

Levels of Leadership

Assignment Overview:
If you fail to honor your people, they will fail to honor you. It is said of a good leader that when the work is done, the aim fulfilled, the people will say, ‘We did this ourselves’.—Lao Tzu, 604–531 BC, (Founder of Taoism,Tao Te Ching)

In the past, leadership was viewed as a managerial role that involved controlling subordinates. When leadership is viewed instead as a behaviour, every individual in an organization can contribute to the leadership process. At the same time, even though leadership is a behaviour, it cannot exist in a vacuum. In order to have leadership, you
must also have followership. Rowitz (2014) specifies in his first level of leadership that ‘public health leaders do not work alone’ and emphasizes the need for teams of leaders and followers. Different forms of leadership require different characteristics in followers (p.101). Some leadership styles prefer that followers simply follow and do not desire any collaboration or input. Other leadership styles see followers as contributing team members and seek input from all individuals.
You will be completing a multi-part assignment
To prepare for this assignment:
• Review Rowitz’s Five Levels of Leadership
1. Personal Level
2. Team Level
3. Agency Level
4. Community Level
5. Professional Level
Your focus for this assignment will be on level 2-5 from above.
Write a 2500-word paper—the total for all four parts—that addresses the following:

• Part 1: Team Level of Leadership
o Describe how you might apply strategies to effectively lead change and facilitate collaboration and the empowerment of others.
o Explain the relationships among leadership, power, ethics and values at the ‘Team Level’ of leadership.
o Apply strategies for effective change management with individuals and teams.
o Analyse principles for effective governance including team accountability.

• Part 2: Agency Level of Leadership

o Analyse the relationships among leadership, power, ethics and values at the ‘Agency Level’ of leadership.Explain how these relationships would be different than at the ‘Team Level’ of leadership, if they are different.

• Part 3: Community Level of Leadership

o Analyse the relationships among leadership, power, ethics and values at the ‘Community Level’ of leadership. Explain how these relationships would be different than at the ‘Team Level’ or at the ‘Agency Level’, if they are different.
o Apply strategies for effective change management with communities.
o Assess principles for effective governance including community accountability.

• Part 4: Professional Level of Leadership
o Analyse the relationships among leadership, power, ethics and values at the ‘Professional Level’ of leadership.
o Explain how these relationships might vary from the other four of ‘Rowitz’s Five Levels of Leadership’.
o Develop leadership strategies for effective change management with
individuals and organisations in regard to ‘Rowitz’s Five Levels of Leadership’.
o Apply your analysis to Rowitz’s recently added sixth level of leadership: ‘Communication’

Resources

NB:PLEASE NOTE THE CORE RESOURCE FOR THIS PAPER IS:- Rowitz, L. (2014). Public health leadership: Putting principles into practice (3rd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning
OTHER RESOURCES
Healey, B. J., & Lesneski, C. D. (2011). Transforming public health practice: Leadership and management essentials. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Transforming Public Health Practice: Leadership and Management Essentials by Healey, B.; Lesneski, C. Copyright 2011 by John Wiley & Sons—Books. Reprinted by permission of John Wiley & Sons—Books via the Copyright Clearance Center.
Chapter 9, ‘Leading and Managing Change in Public Health Organizations’

Johnson, A., & Paton, K. (2007). Health promotion and health services: Management for change. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Health Promotion and Health Services: Management for Change by Johnson, A.; Paton, K. Copyright 2006 by Oxford University Press (Australia). Reprinted by permission of Oxford University Press (Australia) via the Copyright Clearance Center.
Chapter 3, ‘Changing Health Services to Become More Health Promoting’
Chapter 5, ‘A Model for Effective Change Management—the Paton-Johnson Model

Rowitz, L. (2014). Public health leadership: Putting principles into practice (3rd ed.). Burlington,
Chapter 6, ‘The Five Levels of Leadership’
Chapter 24, ‘Leadership and Change’

Alimo-Metcalfe, B., & Alban-Metcalfe, J. (2008). Engaging leadership: Creating organisations that maximize the potential of their people. Retrieved from http://www.cipd.co.uk/NR/rdonlyres/F72D3236-E832-4663-ABEC-BCC7890DC431/0/Engaging_leadership_STF.pdf

Amy, A. H. (2008). Leaders as facilitators of individual and organizational learning. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 29(3), 212–234.
‘Leaders as Facilitators of Individual and Organisational Learning’ by Amy, A., in Leadership & Organization Development Journal, Vol. 29/Issue 3. Copyright 2008 by Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Reprinted by permission of Emerald Group Publishing Limited via the Copyright Clearance Center.

Healey, B. J., & Lesneski, C. D. (2011). Transforming public health practice: Leadership and management essentials. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
Transforming Public Health Practice: Leadership and Management Essentials by Healey, B.; Lesneski, C. Copyright 2011 by John Wiley & Sons—Books. Reprinted by permission of John Wiley & Sons—Books via the Copyright Clearance Center.
Chapter 9, ‘Leading and Managing Change in Public Health Organizations’

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